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Representatives from CNI member organizations gather twice annually to explore new technologies, content, and applications; to further collaboration; to analyze technology policy issues, and to catalyze the development and deployment of new projects. Each member organization may send two representatives. Visit https://www.cni.org/mm/fall-2018 for more information.
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Monday, December 10
 

8:30am

11:00am

Registration Open
Monday December 10, 2018 11:00am - 4:00pm
Regency Gallery

11:30am

12:15pm

Break
Monday December 10, 2018 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Ambassador Ballroom

1:15pm

Opening Plenary: 2018 in Review and 2019 in Prospect
Speakers
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch is Executive Director at the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), a joint program of the Association of Research Libraries and EDUCAUSE, based in Washington, DC.Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President... Read More →


Monday December 10, 2018 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Regency Ballroom

2:15pm

Break
Monday December 10, 2018 2:15pm - 2:30pm
Ambassador Ballroom

2:30pm

1.1 From Talking to Action: Fostering Deep Collaboration Between University Libraries, Museums, and IT
The CNI Executive Roundtable on library and information technology (IT) partnerships with campus museums and archives (December 2016) reported on numerous opportunities for collaboration and a number of barriers to realizing them. "One participant noted that he would like to better understand how to move people from talking about collaboration to doing it."

In this session, Yale University will share how its libraries, museums, and IT services moved from talking to action. Presenters will share their diverse organizational viewpoints into the initiative, the mission commonalities identified as opportunities, and the organizational differences that appropriately require diverse departmental approaches. They will provide insight into the process that led to convergence on shared services for digital preservation and digital asset management as well as adoption of the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) as a university standard. Mechanisms put in place to sustain, guide, and optimize this collaboration over time will be covered, including a funding model, shared funding of staff positions, governance structures, and a shared services sustainability model. The presenters will pose questions to participants to encourage a sharing of collaboration experiences and the steps taken to advance from talking to action in library, museum, and IT collaboration.

Speakers
MA

Michael Appleby

Head of IT, Yale Center for British Art
SG

Susan Gibbons

Stephen F. Gates ’68 University Librarian; Deputy Provost for Collections & Scholarly Communication, Yale University
DH

Dale Hendrickson

Director of Library Information Technology, Yale University
LK

Louis King

Enterprise Architect, Yale University


Monday December 10, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Regency Ballroom

2:30pm

1.2 Internet Identity and the Research Community: A Renewed Focus on a Deeper Stack
Internet identity has its roots in the research community, much as did the original internet. And, in similar fashion, the move of internet identity from serving the research community it was started in into a global ubiquitous infrastructure has resulted in a broad utility that has less focus on the scholarly mission. Now, attention is returning to enabling collaboration again. Moreover, in the new landscape of network and cloud leveraged research, there are now more layers of academic infrastructure, to be managed seamlessly and together. A collaboration community may want to share resources as diverse as wikis, data sets, network bandwidth, and computing cloud and storage with demanding performance and security needs, all in a consistent fashion. As the collaboration stack gets deeper, the coherent management of it gets harder. Both campuses and cloud service providers are beginning to address these management needs. The two approaches are very different but face similar challenges: compliance with sensitive data, inter-cloud usage, and last but not least, the complicated politics and funding of academic research. This talk will discuss the increasing complexity and depth of the collaboration stack and how campuses and cloud service providers are approaching this management.

Speakers
KK

Kenneth Klingenstein

Identity Evangelist, Internet2


Monday December 10, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Executive Room

2:30pm

1.3 Moore-Sloan Data Science Environments Project Update
Although data-driven research is already accelerating scientific discovery, substantial systemic challenges in academia need to be overcome to maximize its impact. Toward that end, working in partnership with one another and with the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, three universities (the University of California Berkeley, New York University, and the University of Washington) have been attempting to create supportive environments for researchers using and developing data-intensive practices. Known as the Moore-Sloan Data Science Environments (MSDSE), this collaboration is structured through a set of working groups on cross-cutting topics viewed as critical to advancing data science in academia: career paths and incentives, software development, education, reproducibility and open science, reflexive and reflective ethnography, and the role of physical space in collaboration. This project briefing will cover the efforts and activities of the MSDSE partnership and share some of the best practices and lessons learned that have emerged from five years of collaborative institutional experimentation, from cross-domain workshops and project incubators to the challenges of creating (and filling) new staff data scientist positions outside of any one particular lab or discipline. This briefing will also report on a recent landscape overview of data science in US research universities completed by Abt Associates as part of an evaluation of the MSDSE partnership, as well as a recent leadership summit of data science faculty leads from universities across the country.

Additional authors: Josh Greenberg (Sloan Foundation), Chris Mentzel (Moore Foundation)

www.msdse.org

Speakers
avatar for Micaela Parker

Micaela Parker

Executive Director, Academic Data Science Alliance


Monday December 10, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Diplomat Room

2:30pm

1.4 Collaboration by Design: Library as Hub for Creative Problem-Solving Space
iZone is a collaborative hub of innovation for students to explore ideas and solve problems for social, cultural, community and economic benefit. iZone is a 21st century expression of early libraries where ideas were explored and knowledge created amidst a vibrant community and space, infused with expertise, technology and scholarly resources. This interactive presentation will describe the genesis of iZone in response to student demand, the user research that underpins iZone and provided the case for support, and the iterative process of program and service development that utilizes a student peer-led and collaborative model to deliver mission-critical activities. The presenters will share the mutual benefit of siting iZone in a research library, and how this is equipping library staff with greater comfort with risk-taking and ambiguity.

https://izone.lib.rochester.edu/

Speakers
avatar for Elliot Felix

Elliot Felix

Founder & CEO, brightspot strategy
Elliot founded and leads brightspot, a strategy consultancy that connects people, programs, and places to increase student success, improve research support, and enable staff productivity while making the organization and operations more efficient. Elliot is an accomplished strategist... Read More →
JM

Julia Maddox

Director, iZone, University of Rochester
avatar for Mary Ann Mavrinac

Mary Ann Mavrinac

Vice Provost, Andrew H. and Janet Dayton Neilly Dean, Libraries, University of Rochester


Monday December 10, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Congressional A

2:30pm

1.5 Evaluating and Closing Privacy Gaps for Online Library Services
Negotiating for What We Want: A Proposal for Model License Language on User Privacy (Hinchliffe, Zimmerman)



Privacy continues to be a significant topic of concern for libraries, particularly with respect to user tracking in third-party systems. The National Forum on Web Privacy and Web Analytics identified the development of model license language on user privacy as a strategy for supporting libraries in advocating for privacy. 



Such language could build on the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) Consensus Principles on Users' Digital Privacy in Library, Publisher, and Software-Provider Systems as well as other efforts currently underway such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Privacy Framework development.

This issue-oriented session will explore the desirability and feasibility of model license language for user privacy, data tracking, data security, consent, etc. as well as possible approaches to developing and supporting such license language.  The session will conclude with a discussion of concrete next steps and expressions of interest in participating in this potential community collaborative project.

https://www.lib.montana.edu/privacy-forum/
https://www.niso.org/publications/privacy-principles
https://www.nist.gov/privacy-framework


Privacy Gaps in Mediated Library Services (Altman, Zimmerman)



Privacy underpins both individual agency and societal intellectual freedom. In this presentation we examine how patron privacy is protected in theory and practice when accessing electronic resources. We develop a taxonomy of library privacy policy components, using the NISO principles as a framework, and mapping relevant American Library Association practices and General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requirements to this framework. We then conduct a systematic analysis of both the privacy policies, and web-based tracking mechanisms used by major vendors. We find that the transition to digital content has created significant gaps in privacy protections: When the library provides content through third-party services, patron data may be used in unanticipated ways that conflict with library and patron values. We end with a discussion of mitigation methods and consideration for library strategy.

https://informatics.mit.edu/

Speakers
MA

Micah Altman

Director of Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
lisahinchliffe.com
KZ

Katie Zimmerman

Scholarly Communications and Licensing Librarian, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries
Katie Zimmerman is a Scholarly Communications and Licensing Librarian at MIT and a licensed attorney in Massachusetts. She focuses on copyright and licensing issues for libraries and universities.


Monday December 10, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Congressional B

2:30pm

1.6 Changing the Geospatial Data Landscape in Libraries
While geospatial methods are an increasingly powerful research tool across many disciplines, there are significant barriers to curating and providing access to geospatial data. Discovery, metadata creation, web-based delivery, and preservation present significant challenges for libraries when dealing with geospatial content. Since 2014, a group of organizations has been collaborating to solve these problems together. This collaboration has seen the formation of several successes: open source software projects like GeoBlacklight, collaborative metadata sharing efforts like OpenGeoMetadata, and large-scale organization collaboration to provide federated discovery, such as the Big Ten Academic Alliance Geoportal. While these endeavors have been successful, we have found that not all libraries have the capacity to host content in a digital repository or provide long-term access to data. This talk will discuss the state of the art in technology for geospatial content in libraries, current collaborative approaches that have been successful, and future work that aims to continue the mission of providing greater access to geospatial content.

https://geoblacklight.org/


https://geo.btaa.org/


https://earthworks.stanford.edu

Speakers
avatar for Tom Cramer

Tom Cramer

Associate University Librarian for Digital Library Systems and Services, Stanford University
Blacklight, IIIF, Samvera, Fedora, VIVO, Research Intelligence, DuraSpace, linked data, Web Archiving, geospatial services, open source, community.
avatar for Karen Majewicz

Karen Majewicz

Geospatial Metadata Coordinator, University of Minnesota Libraries
avatar for Jack Reed

Jack Reed

Geospatial Web Engineer, Stanford University


Monday December 10, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Cabinet Room

2:30pm

1.7 Building Community and Support for Open Science at Carnegie Mellon University: A Conference Report
Open science is one of the major ways to combat the "reproducibility crisis" plaguing many areas of research, from biomedical research to psychology and data science. Despite growing interest and increasing mandates to make research outputs openly available and to facilitate collaboration through open data and research tools, barriers exist that prevent the broader adoption of open science. Lack of incentives, metrics, and an open culture persist as main roadblocks to the adoption of open science practices. Universities' libraries are playing increasingly important roles in open science adoption by providing training, resources, and expertise. However, one of the challenges many libraries face is the ability to connect and collaborate with the research community. Facing this challenge, three liaison librarians at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) teamed up with faculty in Biological Sciences, thanks to the embedded liaison model at CMU. Together, we obtained a joint grant from the DSF Charitable Foundation (through the Mellon College of Science) to host a transdisciplinary Open Science Symposium on Oct 18-19, 2018. Comprised of a series of presentations, panel discussion, hands-on workshops and a "scientific speed dating" event, this symposium stimulated discussions about opportunities and challenges in open science practices, accelerated the adoption of open research tools, and built community and collaborations in life sciences and related disciplines. We expected this event to be well-attended and highly interactive. In the first two weeks after the registration opened, an impressive response was received from CMU and nearby universities, with more than 75% or registrations being graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and faculty. As deliverables of the symposium, we will publish a conference report summarizing discussions at the symposium, make a set of recommendations for advancing open science at CMU, and make plans to host a future event to reach a broader set of disciplines.

https://events.mcs.cmu.edu/oss2018/

Speakers
avatar for Huajin Wang

Huajin Wang

Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University
Huajin Wang is a cell biologist and librarian. With more than 10 years of research experience in molecular and cellular biology, lipid metabolism, bioinformatics, and computational analysis of large biomedical datasets, she has deep understanding of research data. She is passionate... Read More →
avatar for Keith Webster

Keith Webster

Dean, University Libraries, Carnegie Mellon University
Keith Webster was appointed Dean of University Libraries at Carnegie Mellon in July 2013 and to the additional role of Director of Emerging and Integrative Media Initiatives two years later. He is a Professor in the University’s Heinz College of Information Systems and Policy. Keith... Read More →


Monday December 10, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Forum Room

2:30pm

1.8 Are Digital Humanities Projects Sustainable? A Proposed Service Model for a DH Infrastructure
The University of Oxford, like many universities, is facing difficult choices about how to sustain, preserve, and/or archive its hundreds of digital humanities (DH) projects that have reached the conclusion of their funding or support. Our in-depth analysis of the functional requirements of DH projects included extensive interviews with the creators of more than 30 projects. We have uncovered a more robust and detailed picture of how both active and retired DH projects differ from the most common research data management and preservation models, and of their unique technical sustainability and preservation issues. This presentation will describe our findings of the unique characteristics of DH projects that make them more challenging to preserve and sustain, as well as our proposed layered service model for a more sustainable digital humanities infrastructure.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Hurst

Megan Hurst

Chief Experience Officer, Athenaeum21
I co-founded Athenaeum21 with Christine Madsen to help libraries, museums, publishers and knowledge organizations evolve, innovate, and lead our information age. My areas of expertise and passion are user experience, user research, digital strategy, assessment, digital humanities... Read More →
avatar for Christine Madsen

Christine Madsen

Chief Innovation Officer, Athenaeum21
Dr Christine Madsen works at the intersection of libraries and technology. She is expert in building large-scale systems that use technology to connect researchers, teachers, and students with library and learning resources. She is interested in understanding and building the library... Read More →



Monday December 10, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Empire Room Lower Level 2B

3:15pm

Break
Monday December 10, 2018 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Ambassador Ballroom

3:45pm

2.1 Public Access to Research Data: Report from the AAU APLU Public Access Working Group Workshop
This panel presentation will report on a National Science Foundation-funded workshop held in October 2018 on public access to data. The invitational workshop, organized by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and the Association of American Universities (AAU), convened small teams of library leaders, chief information officers, data scientists, and vice presidents of research from approximately 30 universities to 1) advance institutional plans to provide public access to research data, 2) foster inter-institutional collaboration and build consensus around key system requirements for managing FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) data, and 3) encourage discussion across stakeholder communities, including universities and funders, to support common approaches to data sharing. The workshop followed an APLU-AAU Public Access Working Group Report published in 2017, which contained recommendations for federal agencies, guidance for research universities, and data management resources.

https://www.aau.edu/sites/default/files/AAU-Files/Key-Issues/Intellectual-Property/Public-Open-Access/AAU-APLU-Public-Access-Working-Group-Report.pdf

Speakers
ML

Mary Lee Kennedy

Executive Director, Association of Research Libraries
KR

Kacy Redd

Assistant Vice President of STEM Education Policy, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities
KS

Katie Steen

Policy Associate, Association of American Universities
TW

Tyler Walters

Dean, University Libraries, Virginia Tech


Monday December 10, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Regency Ballroom

3:45pm

2.2 From Prototype to Production: Turning Good Ideas into Useful Library Services
Over the past 18 months, OCLC Research has been working to develop a workflow to ensure that new ideas can find their way into usable production services. Successful transition between ideation, research and development activities, and production planning requires building a lot of bridges both within the organization and externally with library partners. This session will explore two projects that are at different points of the prototype-to-production workflow: IIIF—integration of the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) into a digital discovery environment (completed project); Linked Data Wikibase prototype-a linked data reconciliation tool and editor built to match library metadata workflows (transitioning to production and first reported on at the spring 2018 CNI meeting). Temple University will present on the experience from the experimenter and practitioner point of view. The session will end with an open discussion of the ultimate goal of these efforts: creation of a multi-party collaborative "labs" space for library research, data science activities, innovation ideation, and application prototyping.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Pace

Andrew Pace

Executive Director, Technical Research, OCLC Research
Andrew leads a team of research scientists, architects, and engineers who track library and broader data science trends and is responsible for building a coordinated R&D strategy for OCLC Research. Previously, he directed the development of the WorldShare Platform, WorldShare Management... Read More →
avatar for Holly Tomren

Holly Tomren

Head of Metadata and Digitization Services, Temple University



Monday December 10, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Executive Room

3:45pm

2.3 Where Next for the Open Library of Humanities and Consortial Funding Models for Open Access?
Although open access has become associated with article processing charges, the consortial business models underpinning the Open Library of Humanities, Knowledge Unlatched, arXiv, and even SCOAP3 have been highly successful within their own domains. These models, though, are theorized to have scalability limits. This session will include discussion of the next steps for the Open Library of Humanities in the emergent political contexts of the European Union's Plan S, and attempts to spread the model more widely.

https://www.openlibhums.org

Speakers
MP

Martin Paul Eve

Professor of Literature, Technology and Publishing, Birkbeck, University of London


Monday December 10, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Diplomat Room

3:45pm

2.4 Update on Funding Possibilities, Priorities, and Trends
In this update, representatives of major federal funding agencies and private-sector foundations/non-profits will discuss the current status of programs, goals and processes most relevant to the CNI community and will offer observations on trends and priorities in the fields they monitor. Ample opportunity will be allowed for audience dialogue.

Speakers
avatar for Joy M. Banks

Joy M. Banks

Program Officer, CLIR
I help administrate the Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives and the Recordings at Risk regranting programs. My duties range from applicant and recipient support to assessment. My professional background weaves through the LAM world with experience in cataloging/metadata... Read More →
avatar for Lucy Barber

Lucy Barber

Deputy Executive Director, National Historical Publications & Records Commission
Lucy Barber, Deputy Executive Director, National Historical Publications and Records Commission (lucy.barber@nara.gov; 202-357-5306, http://www.archives.gov/nhprc) At the Commission, which she joined in 2006, Lucy oversees the grant making process in connection with other program... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Hswe

Patricia Hswe

Program Officer for Scholarly Communications, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
avatar for Kelcy Shepherd

Kelcy Shepherd

Associate Deputy Director for Discretionary Programs, IMLS


Monday December 10, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Empire Room Lower Level 2B

3:45pm

2.5 Hiding In Plain Sight: The Value of Machine-Processable Copyright Data
For several years, there has been a conversation about how to better identify the copyright status of a work. A key to that is meaningful access to the records of the US Copyright Office. This panel will feature briefings and discussions of projects that are publishing and using historic copyright data online, and show how making such data available in searchable, machine-processable, and linkable forms can enable libraries and other cultural institutions to legally use and share underused public domain and copyrighted literature and scholarship with greater confidence. The session will report on the Institute of Museum and Library Services-funded project the University of Pennsylvania that undertook to publish a comprehensive inventory online of first copyright renewals of 20th-century serials to make it easier to establish their public domain status, and it will show how putting that data online has also enabled interlinking with rights registries, crowdsourced bibliographic databases, and Wikidata. It will also include a report on the New York Public Library's ongoing structured conversion of original registrations and discuss how this can be used for rights determination and potential humanities research. Conceptual ideas for possibly using machine learning and crowdsourcing to transcribe the Catalog of Copyright Entries (the CCE) and the value of formal and informal, ongoing professional collaboration will also be discussed.

https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/cce/firstperiod.html

https://github.com/NYPL/catalog_of_copyright_entries_project

Speakers
avatar for Greg Cram

Greg Cram

Associate Director of Copyright and Information Policy, New York Public Library
Greg Cram is the Associate Director of Copyright and Information Policy at The New York Public Library. Greg endeavors to make the Library’s collections broadly available to researchers and the public. He is responsible for developing and implementing policies and practices around... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Levine

Melissa Levine

Director, U-M Library Copyright Office, University of Michigan
JM

John Mark Ockerbloom

University of Pennsylvania


Monday December 10, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Congressional B

3:45pm

2.6 The Challenge of Hidden Big Data Collections: Making Digital Congressional Papers Available for Scholarly Research
Go Big or Go Home: Collection and Infrastructure Development in the Age of Big Data (Gerth, Boss)



Libraries are increasingly being asked to look past big research datasets and instead see collections themselves as data. In 2016, the University of Nevada, Reno took in 6.4 million digital files as part of the congressional papers of Senator Harry Reid. As the biggest acquisition of data for the library to date, many mid-stream adjustments to the library's infrastructure, workflows, and tools had to be made to sustainably support an increasingly modern type of collection development. This session will detail the lessons learned from those changes and their implications that stem from the library approaching the collection as data.



Congressional Correspondence Data Tool: Making Constituent Correspondence Available for Research (Tapia)



When congressional offices close, the constituent correspondence data that they have collected in proprietary software is often exported and given to archives and libraries along with their papers and other materials. Archives and libraries are currently ill-prepared to make this data available to researchers. The West Virginia University (WVU) Libraries have created the Constituent Correspondence Data Tool (CCDT) as an open source software product designed to allow archivists to easily upload their data and make it available for research. WVU has secured a 2018 Lyrasis Catalyst Grant to complete a feasibility study to assess CCDT and plan for a future collaborative technical infrastructure for the tool. This presentation will include a brief demonstration of CCDT, discussion regarding the challenges of scaling its use to other libraries and museums, and goals of the grant.

https://ccdt.lib.wvu.edu/

Speakers
EB

Emily Boss

Head of Metadata and Cataloging, University of Nevada, Reno
NG

Nathan Gerth

Digital Archivist, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries
JT

Jessica Tapia

Head, Digital and Web Services, West Virginia University


Monday December 10, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Cabinet Room

3:45pm

2.7 Lever Press Project Update
"Give me a place to stand with a lever," said Archimedes, "and I can move the whole world."





Several years ago, a group of liberal-arts college library directors, despairing over the crisis in academic publishing, wringing their hands over failed efforts to reform the system, and kvetching about the millions of dollars they dispatch annually to the coffers of presses whose practices they oppose, decided to repurpose some funds and create the lever they lacked. The result: Lever Press. In this session we will provide an update on progress made by Lever Press since its launch, demonstrating how a group of libraries can seize the initiative and make changes to the scholarly monograph publishing landscape, in a manner consistent with their institutional missions. The presenters will describe the current editorial process and pipeline; demonstrate the technical underpinnings of Lever Press; and offer the perspectives of library directors and faculty authors who have been involved in the project. Lever Press devotes itself to producing the highest quality scholarship in an economically sustainable model, and leads the way towards establishing best practices for born-digital, peer reviewed, open access monograph publishing. Unconstrained by legacy publishing processes, Lever Press publishes not only traditional narratives; it also employs "Fulcrum," the state-of-the-art digital platform developed at the University of Michigan Press. All works published by Lever Press are freely available to read online, immediately upon publication. Unlike most open access presses, however, Lever Press never charges readers nor authors. Funding is provided by its 54 charter member libraries who elect representatives to govern it.

At a time when cOAlition S is advancing open access to research publications, Lever Press is changing the game for scholarly monograph access and publishing.

https://www.leverpress.org/


https://www.fulcrum.org/

Speakers
avatar for Marta Brunner

Marta Brunner

College Librarian, Skidmore College
ME

Mark Edington

Director, Amherst College Press, Amherst College
PS

Peggy Seiden

Professor, Old Dominion University
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan Library
I'm AUL for Publishing at University of Michigan Library and Director of University of Michigan Press. I'm particularly interested in next-gen institutional repositories, the future of ebook collections and acquisitions, and how books can also get to participate in the networked digital... Read More →


Monday December 10, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Forum Room

3:45pm

2.8 Software Preservation Network: Advancing Best Practices
The Software Preservation Network (SPN) was instantiated in 2016 as a volunteer network of individuals and organizations committed to the long-term preservation, sharing and reuse of software. Through our working groups and affiliated projects, we are developing tools, guidelines, and workflows that build capacity for a broad range of cultural stewardship organizations to participate in software. One of its affiliated projects (which relied on SPN's network and resources extensively) is the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Software Preservation. This briefing will catch attendees up on the latest developments with SPN, including its recently issued prospectus, and give an overview of the Code as an example of SPN's efforts to support software preservation. Panelists will answer the following questions:
  • How has the software preservation landscape evolved over the past three years, and what has been SPN's role in that evolution?
  • How does SPN work and what resources has it developed through its working groups and affiliated projects?


  • What are fair use best practices and how do they help communities apply fair use?
  • Why does the software preservation community need fair use?
  • How does the Code of Best Practices impact and accelerate the work of the software preservation community?



http://www.softwarepreservationnetwork.org/


http://www.arl.org/news/arl-news/4629-software-preservation-best-practices-in-fair-use-to-help-safeguard-cultural-record-advance-research#.W7iWiGhKg2x

Speakers
avatar for Brandon Butler

Brandon Butler

Director, Information Policy, University of Virginia Libraries
Brandon is the first Director of Information Policy at the UVA Library. He provides guidance and education to the Library and its user community on intellectual property and related issues, and advocates on the Library's behalf. He received his J.D. from the UVA School of Law in... Read More →
avatar for Robert German

Robert German

Senior Director, Scholarly Communication, University of Virginia Library
JW

Jessica W. Meyerson

Director of Strategy & Research, Educopia Institute
avatar for Katherine Skinner

Katherine Skinner

Executive Director, Educopia Institute


Monday December 10, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Senate Room

4:45pm

Break
Monday December 10, 2018 4:45pm - 5:00pm
Ambassador Ballroom

5:00pm

3.1 Library as Platform: The Transformed Library's Impact on Teaching and Learning
The transformation of library spaces and associated technologies provides significant opportunities to fundamentally engage and foster creative models of teaching and learning. The combination of high-technology spaces, flexible learning environments, and librarian expertise has fostered an experiential learning environment that faculty and students have leveraged to enhance the educational experience. This session will explore several examples of experiential learning, creative uses of high-technology spaces, and the important combination of ingredients to maximize the experiential learning potential of new library spaces, re-positioning the library as a fundamental difference maker in the educational environment provided by colleges and universities.

https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/stories/shooting-wars
https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/stories/anthropology-in-360%C2%B0-cultural-immersion-in-the-visualization-studio
https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/stories/remaking-teaching-prototyping-new-technologies-classroom

Speakers
avatar for Jason Evans Groth

Jason Evans Groth

Digital Media Librarian, North Carolina State University
Jason Evans Groth is a Digital Media Librarian at NCSU Libraries. As part of the Learning Spaces and Services department he helps to support the eleven audio and video production suites and several other high-tech creative multimedia spaces. He earned his MIS/MLS from the School of... Read More →
avatar for Greg Raschke

Greg Raschke

Interim Director of Libraries, North Carolina State University


Monday December 10, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Regency Ballroom

5:00pm

3.2 Towards Interoperable and Equitable Scholarly Communications Ecosystems: Values-based Questions to Ask Infrastructure Providers
Academics and academic institutions are navigating internal and external pressures for reporting, research intelligence, research production, sharing, and access while a proliferation of “time-saving,” “problem-solving” services and products are being marketed to them by a variety of publishers and vendors. The continued success of all who are involved in the scholarly communication ecosystem hinges on the ability to anticipate external and internal opportunities and challenges while making informed economic decisions. University of California San Diego Library Scholarly Communications and Research Data Management Programs teamed up to design and facilitate a 2018 Force11 Scholarly Communications Institute (FSCI) week-long course that was based on the observation that systems of scholarly communication are multiplying rapidly. These systems are being marketed to our campuses as either single solutions to address single specific stakeholder needs or as entire interoperable systems in support of the entire scholarly communication ecosystem. To help navigate this evolving issue, members of the FSCI course undertook a new project, aimed at raising awareness of the models, systems, drivers in play, and to communicate the issue among all the stakeholders. The project was carried out in subsequent months by the participants in a multi-institution collaboration that resulted in a visualization model intended to frame the issue and a set of checklists to help determine institutional priorities in selecting products to support the scholarly communication infrastructure. The goal of the project is to shape and guide infrastructure adoption so that our academic institutions will influence and contribute to a healthy, sustainable, fair and equitable research information and scholarly communication ecosystem.

https://www.force11.org/fsci/2018/course-abstracts#AM5

Speakers
avatar for David Minor

David Minor

Director, Research Data Curation Program, UC San Diego Library
I'm focused on defining what is needed for the contemporary and long-term management of digital data and resources. My position includes significant interaction with stakeholders on the UC San Diego campus, throughout the UC System, and national initiatives. Our program also includes... Read More →
avatar for Allegra Swift

Allegra Swift

Scholarly Communication Librarian, UCSD
I support researchers and scholars at UC San Diego from all backgrounds, disciplines, and at all career stages to use, create, and publish scholarship and research in ways that promote its dissemination, accessibility, and impact.I offer guidance so that our academic community can... Read More →


Monday December 10, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Executive Room

5:00pm

3.3 Developing Library Strategy for 3D and Virtual Reality Collection Development and Reuse
3D and virtual reality (VR) technologies show great promise for a range of scholarly fields as they offer new potential for interactive visualization and analysis of artifacts, spaces, and data. Lower costs and greater computational power have made 3D and VR technologies financially realistic for a broader variety of institutions. As a result, sustainable programs and infrastructure for access and management of 3D and VR data are now vital. This presentation will provide an update on the Institute of Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grant (LG-73-17-0141-17)—a partnership between three academic libraries (Virginia Tech, Indiana University, and the University of Oklahoma) to study and make recommendations for library adoption of 3D and VR services. We will present preliminary findings synthesized from our three forums hosted in 2018. Audience members will have a greater understanding of resources required for developing, managing, and hosting 3D models, datasets, and associated technologies.

Speakers
avatar for Nathan Hall

Nathan Hall

Director, Digital Imaging and Preservation, Virginia Tech
I am an associate professor at Virginia Tech, where I direct digital imaging and digital preservation services for the University Libraries. I am PI on the IMLS funded project, Community Development Model For Digital Community Archives. I am interested in equitable partnerships... Read More →
avatar for Jamie Wittenberg

Jamie Wittenberg

Head of Scholarly Communication & Research Data Management Librarian, Indiana University Libraries
I am head of the scholarly communication department at the IU Libraries. My work focuses on enabling open access to scholarship, facilitating reuse, transparent research practices, and innovation. My team runs a repository service, library publishing service, and research data service... Read More →


Monday December 10, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Diplomat Room

5:00pm

3.5 Planning a Community-Created Data Rescue Toolkit
This presentation will report on the status of the Institute of Museum and Library Services-funded project "Building a Community-Created Data Rescue Toolkit." Data rescue provides an important opportunity for research libraries to collaborate with each other, as well as with public libraries, businesses, government agencies, and community volunteers and organizers. Building on previous gatherings at the institution, Johns Hopkins University hosted a meeting of diverse stakeholders in September 2018 to develop plans, identify areas for collaboration, and streamline entry points for interested parties. The Data Rescue Toolkit will provide a social and technical framework to connect individuals, groups, and organizations collaborating to identify, collect, describe, curate, preserve, and provide long-term access to federal, state, and local government data. The Toolkit will emphasize (re)use and accessibility of data for users of all kinds, and will be developed through an open, collaborative process that builds on the existing energy and expertise within our community. The community will create a scalable Toolkit to meet the needs of a dynamic group of users and will continuously enhance and grow the project.  We will also report on other projects that came out of our meeting in September 2018. The meeting spurred development of a registry tool that data managers can use to notify the community when they plan to deaccession data, need assistance migrating data forward, have a collection defunded, or need some other site to host data. We would like to acknowledge and thank all of the community members contributing to the project, especially Ruth Duerr.

https://osf.io/j7knc/?view_only=406fb2a254c84cd7bc113183fb8b5f1f


Speakers
avatar for Mara Blake

Mara Blake

Manager of Data Services, Johns Hopkins University
Mara is the Manager of Data Services, a team based in the Sheridan Libraries of Johns Hopkins University. Data Services supports users finding and accessing data; using data and utilizing Geographic Information Systems (GIS); managing and sharing research data; and oversees the JHU... Read More →
KM

Katie Mika

Data Services Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder


Monday December 10, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Congressional B

5:00pm

3.6 Enriching Memory and Memoir by Digital Means
One of the challenges posed by traditional memoir is its heavy reliance on salient, poignant memories to shape a compelling narrative. Repetitive, entrenched rehearsals of such outsized events can obscure clearer remembrance of larger and potentially more interesting patterns. We are all, in a sense, blind to both our past and present. This presentation explores how spreadsheets, maps, and data visualization tools both substantively altered the construction of a book-length memoir and led to the creation of an assignment on racial mapping for a large-section undergraduate class. In the memoir's deliberate engagement with topology and topography, the use of digital tools helped chart friendships, racial ambiguities, and violence across a contested Seattle neighborhood in the 1960s and 1970s. The assignment that evolved with this work provides a lightweight way for undergraduates from any discipline to use digital tools in exploring race in the neighborhood where they grew up. Students often spend more time on the assignment than they are required to because they find it so interesting. This presentation is designed to encourage everyone to engage in alternate tools for thinking about where they grew up and to showcase the assignment that introduces even tech-wary students to the value of digital visualization tools.

Speakers
avatar for Brett Bodemer

Brett Bodemer

College of Liberal Arts Librarian, Coordinator of the Digital Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities Hub, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo
I bring to librarianship a background in creative writing, history, and foreign languages. As the Humanities librarian at a Polytechnic University I collaborate with our GIS and Data Specialist and our Digital Archivist to inspire students and faculty across disciplines to approach... Read More →


Monday December 10, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Cabinet Room

5:00pm

3.7 Enhancing Exhibit Engagement Metrics with Open Source
Creatively re-thinking space allows libraries the opportunity to find unique niches for exhibits in walkways, nooks, and unused walls. As we begin repurposing these spaces for dynamic and changing exhibit content, it becomes difficult to measure visitor use and engagement. Without enclosed galleries, it is hard to distinguish between the exhibit visitor and the individual walking through a high-traffic thoroughfare. Measure the Future Project, developed by Jason Griffey, allowed University of Oklahoma Libraries to transform their exhibit engagement metrics through open source code and 3D printing. Before the project launched, we had various ways to estimate visits and engagements but none of them provided the definitive return on investment metrics that we needed for our increasingly data-driven campus culture. Since the project launched in September, the Libraries has been able to measure engagement with high accuracy. This presentation will discuss the project, implementation, privacy concerns, and the metrics available with the technology.

Speakers
avatar for Twila Camp

Twila Camp

Senior Director of Digital Innovation & Development, Libraries, University of Oklahoma
As the Senior Director of the Digital Innovation and Development Division, Twila supports the libraries major strategic pillars by providing leadership for library technology, services, and platforms. This division also provides critical support for researchers seeking grants by offering... Read More →


Monday December 10, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Forum Room

5:00pm

3.8 First Steps in Research Data Management Under Constraints of a National Security Laboratory
Research data management efforts, including the implementation of tools, development of best practices, and training of scholars, have taken center stage in many academic libraries. What is unique about the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Research Library, however, is the technology and policy environment in which we have launched our collaborative data management pilot "Nucleus." Based on a local installation of the open source software Open Science Framework, we have established a platform that offers connectors to local storage, internal source code repositories, and LANL's institutional review and release system.

In this presentation, we will highlight interviews and surveys conducted with LANL scientists to distill their highest-priority data management needs at LANL, outline laboratory-specific constraints relevant to the implementation of our pilot project, offer a functionality overview of Nucleus, and share feedback received as the result of initial outreach activities. It is our intention to share the lessons we have learned with the CNI community, as we believe that, even though LANL's environment is unique, other institutions may find themselves in similar situations and can benefit from our approach of locally hosted software platforms.

Speakers
BC

Brian Cain

Library Technology Professional, Los Alamos National Laboratory
avatar for Martin Klein

Martin Klein

Scientist, Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory


Monday December 10, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Senate Room

5:00pm

CANCELED: 3.4 Demonstrating Faculty Impact: New Data and Visualization Services
WE REGRET THAT, DUE TO WEATHER/TRAVEL DIFFICULTIES, THIS SESSION HAS BEEN CANCELED.

There is a constant and growing focus on impact, efficiency, and data-driven decision-making in higher education today. Academic and non-academic units alike must continually demonstrate their value and communicate their impact to multiple stakeholders. At the University Libraries, UNC (University of North Carolina) Chapel Hill, librarians are adapting services and building expertise to meet these needs. Librarians help faculty and staff demonstrate research impact and advance teaching using the same digital scholarship tools and methods used for research. In this session, we discuss some organizational changes made by the Libraries to focus and facilitate these new services. We also highlight recent examples of this type of work: conducting text analysis of syllabi and citation network analyses of publications to help administrators and faculty in the School of Pharmacy improve curriculum design; creating maps to demonstrate the global reach of campus programs; and preparing bibliometric analyses and citation network visualizations to assist the University's NIH (National Institutes of Health) Clinical and Translational Sciences Award (CTSA) unit in illustrating the impact and reach of CTSA-supported research at UNC-Chapel Hill.



The presenters would like to acknowledge additional colleagues who have contributed to this project:

Dr. Nandita Mani
Associate University Librarian for Health Sciences and Director of the Health Sciences Library


Joe Williams
Director of Public Services

Speakers
BH

Barrie Hayes

Bioinformatics and Research Data Librarian, UNC Health Sciences Library
Barrie Hayes is the Bioinformatics and Translational Science Librarian at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) Health Sciences Libraryand Adjunct Instructor at the UNC-CH School of Information and Library Science. She is one of the leaders of the Health Sciences... Read More →
avatar for Amanda Henley

Amanda Henley

Head of Digital Research Services, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
I am interested in academic library services, technology, and spaces that support scholars using digital methods in teaching and research.


Monday December 10, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Congressional A

5:30pm

Break
Monday December 10, 2018 5:30pm - 5:45pm
Ambassador Ballroom

5:45pm

4.1 Blockchain: What's Not To Like?
We're in a period when blockchain or "distributed ledger technology" is the Solution to Everything™, so it is inevitable that it will be proposed as the solution to problems in academic communication and digital preservation. These proposals typically assume, despite the evidence, that real-world blockchain implementations actually deliver the theoretical attributes of decentralization, immutability, security, anonymity, lack of trust, etc. The proposers appear to believe that Satoshi Nakamoto revealed the infallible Bitcoin protocol to the world on golden tablets; they typically don't appreciate or cite the nearly three decades of research and implementation that led up to it. This talk will discuss the mismatch between theory and practice in blockchain technology, and how it applies to various proposed applications of interest to the CNI audience.

https://blog.dshr.org/


Monday December 10, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Regency Ballroom

5:45pm

4.2 Analyzing Faculty Activity Reporting at the University of Arizona: What Does the Data Tell Us?
Five years after launching a new online faculty activity reporting and annual evaluation system at the University of Arizona, what does examination of the benchmark data tell us? Is the data captured in the system useful? The system uses faculty self-report of activity data, including scholarly contributions, combined with integrations of core campus data systems.  How does the record of faculty scholarly achievements compare to other licensed tools and services? Is the self-report of faculty activities effective? The system captures information about our faculty not previously recorded. What has the system taught us? How can we creatively employ this data, coupled with existing data sources to create new analytical discovery tools? As we continue to assess and analyze data from the system, we'd like to share our experiences and findings to date.

UA Vitae is a shared effort from the Office of the Provost, University Libraries, University Analytics and Information Research, Office of Research, Discovery and Innovation and University Information and Technology Services. This session will be useful for anybody interested in research information management, faculty activity reporting, profile and/or institutional reporting systems.

https://uavitae.arizona.edu

Speakers
MO

Maliaca Oxnam

Associate Librarian, Office of Digital Innovations & Stewardship, University of Arizona
Maliaca Oxnam is the Director for UA Vitae (uavitae.arizona.edu), the faculty activity reporting and annual review system at the University of Arizona in Tucson. When not engaged with UA Vitae, Maliaca is a faculty member in the Office of Digital Innovation and Stewardship in the... Read More →


Monday December 10, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Executive Room

5:45pm

4.3 Can I Trust this Data? Selecting Data for Reuse and Other Dilemmas of the Research Scientist
What are the barriers to finding and using interdisciplinary data, and how do we overcome them?  The Rutgers University Libraries are leading the development of the data services layer of the Virtual Data Collaboratory (VDC), a National Science Foundation-funded regional multidisciplinary research data portal in development by Rutgers University, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) and others. To design the portal, Rutgers, Penn State, and Temple University librarians interviewed research faculty and graduate students about their problems finding and selecting research data.  We discovered that research has become interdisciplinary to the point that graduate students, in particular, had difficulty identifying a discipline they were associated with. Instead, research has become, at least for our sample, inherently multidisciplinary and problem-based.  Interviewees identified trust in data as a primary determiner for selecting data for reuse. Researchers want to know as much, if not more, about the creator of the data as information about the data. To understand the data, they want to know the problem it addresses and the methodology employed more than the discipline it represents. This presentation will present the enlightening results of our research as well as our solution, a Portland Common Data Model metadata representation of the data creator that interacts with metadata for the research data to integrate information about both, including reuse of the data by other VDC participants, in a linked data Samvera environment.

Speakers
GA

Grace Agnew

Special Advisor for Strategic Initiatives, Libraries, Rutgers University


Monday December 10, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Diplomat Room

5:45pm

4.4 Decentralizing SHARE: Bringing SHARE Closer to the Community and the Community Closer to SHARE
Over the past few months, the governance and product development of SHARE has shifted focus to an open source community partner model. Initial technical development focuses on SHARE as a local tool for research administration and building the open source ecosystem to support it. With this latter goal in mind, we are working on developing tools that lower the barrier to entry for collecting, aggregating, remediating, and linking metadata. Further, we are exploring decentralized technologies that will serve to distribute and expand contribution as well as allow for combining private data with that made available publicly in order to better support local use-cases. We will discuss and demonstrate these efforts, as well as discuss our current plans with respect to community-building and decentralized product development.

http://share-research.org

Speakers
CB

Cameron Blandford

Developer, 221b, LLC
avatar for Rick Johnson

Rick Johnson

Program Director of Digital Initiatives and Scholarship, University of Notre Dame
avatar for Ryan Mason

Ryan Mason

Developer, 221b, LLC
Web & mobile developer code enthusiast. Rochester Institute of Technology BS in Information technology.


Monday December 10, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Congressional A

5:45pm

4.5 The Shadow Acquisitions Budget: APCs and Open Access Publications at a Research University
A great deal has been written in the last several years about open access (OA) publishing in academic settings, both Green and Gold. In particular, the Pay It Forward (PIF) project and the OA2020 initiative focused on the feasibility of transitioning to a Gold OA environment supported by article processing charges (APCs). Several studies pointed out that faculty in research 1 (R1) universities tend to publish in Gold OA journals that carry APC charges. Yet, the institutional investment in OA publications and APCs remains difficult to identify and assess. APCs are often paid through a variety of sources, ranging from author discretionary and grant funds to institutional subvention pools. These APC expenditures form a shadow scholarly resources acquisitions budget, with funding typically not coming from library budgets. This presentation provides a quantitative assessment of one R1 institution's level of publication in open access publishing venues. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign employs a SciVal PURE researcher profile system called Illinois Experts. The authors examined 27,300 journal articles from 2013 to mid-2018 contained in Illinois Experts. The number and percentage of publications appearing in Gold APC journals and other OA venues was calculated using scripts that searched against the DOAJ database and the UnPaywall platform. The total APC costs over the six-year period were calculated and the average APC charge was determined. The presentation will report these results.

Speakers
avatar for William H. Mischo

William H. Mischo

Head, Grainger Engineering Library Information Center and Berthold Family Professor in Information Access and Discovery, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Thomas H. Teper

Thomas H. Teper

Associate University Librarian for Collections and Technical Services, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Monday December 10, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Congressional B

5:45pm

4.6 Centering the Community in Liberal Arts Open Source: Reports on Work of the Islandora Collaboration Group and the Five College Consortium
This project briefing will focus on the community building aspect of open source digital repository work, and how this both meets the missions of our liberal arts institutions and is something we are reliant upon in order to accomplish our goals with limited resources. Representatives from the Islandora Collaboration Group (ICG) and the Five College Consortium will speak about three unique perspectives and projects: the ISLE and subsequent LASIR projects from the ICG; Compass, the collaborative Islandora repository from Mt. Holyoke, Hamsphire, and Smith Colleges; and the Fedora developer contributions from Amherst College. The challenge of compromise, the work of consensus-building, and the goals of sustainable, inclusive digital systems will also be addressed by presenters. We would like to recognize the contributions by David Keiser-Clark of Williams College and Sarah Goldstein of Mt. Holyoke College in preparing this presentation.

https://github.com/Islandora-Collaboration-Group/ISLE


https://github.com/Islandora-Collaboration-Group/LASIR


https://compass.fivecolleges.edu/

Speakers
avatar for Joanna DiPasquale

Joanna DiPasquale

Head of Digital Scholarship & Technology Services, Vassar College Libraries
avatar for Este Pope

Este Pope

Head of Digital Programs, Amherst College


Monday December 10, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Cabinet Room

5:45pm

4.7 Transforming the UC Informationist Program: Growing and Aligning Toward Data Science
The University of Cincinnati (UC) Libraries' Informationist program and Research & Data Services (RDS) unit provide an extensive program of support for the research community. RDS is a highly-integrated unit of UC Libraries, staffed by informationists in the health sciences, sciences, engineering and social sciences and librarians, specialist staff, and student consultants. Our activities infuse across the institution, including the main campus and the Academic Health Center campus, and we oversee innovative spaces that respond to the particular needs of research communities, including informatics, geospatial analysis and data visualization. Since the fall 2015 CNI presentation on the UC Informationists ("New Roles, New Collaborations: Developing an Informationist Program to Support University Research"), we have greatly expanded our partnerships, services and educational offerings. We are now active in data and statistical consulting, collaborations on bioinformatics education, impactful community engagements (e.g., UC Data Day), and deep partnerships with the UC IT unit on initiatives such as the Data & Computational Science Series. At present, we are pursuing a new and challenging vision to realign our work in order to enable the institution's agendas for data science and innovation. We will discuss our experience with scalable growth and other successes in Research & Data Services and our assessment of a future in data science.

https://libraries.uc.edu/digital-scholarship/data-services.html 

http://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/blogs/dataday/

Speakers
avatar for Ted Baldwin

Ted Baldwin

Director, Science & Engineering Libraries, University of Cincinnati
TG

Tiffany Grant

Asst. Director for Research and Informatics, Health Sciences Library, University of Cincinnati


Monday December 10, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Forum Room

6:15pm

Reception
Monday December 10, 2018 6:15pm - 7:30pm
Palladian Ballroom
 
Tuesday, December 11
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Tuesday December 11, 2018 7:30am - 9:00am
Palladian Ballroom

7:30am

Registration Open
Tuesday December 11, 2018 7:30am - 2:30pm
Regency Gallery

9:00am

5.1 The State of Digital Preservation: A Snapshot of Triumphs, Gaps, and Open Research Questions
Ensuring the long-term preservation of digital information for future users has been one of the key aspirations of the research library community. Ithaka S+R has been exploring the current state of digital preservation in order to identify research questions and areas for action. Based on interviews with 21 subject experts, we gathered perspectives on the successes, gaps, outstanding issues, and emerging needs in digital preservation. Although the conversations were open-ended, they were framed with questions to probe what seems to be working well now, new research workflows or cultural practices that require novel preservation strategies, and areas that need further attention and research. Our study shows areas of significant progress in the preservation landscape as the community has grown and has established important collaborations. However, the interviews revealed a number of concerns with the pace and nature of these developments and identified several issues that would benefit from further exploration. For this session, we plan to share what we have learned and gather feedback and additional perspectives, as we work to generate a research agenda for Ithaka S+R on digital preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Oya Y. Rieger

Oya Y. Rieger

Senior Advisor, Ithaka S+R
Oya Y. Rieger collaborates with Ithaka S+R’s Libraries, Scholarly Communication, and Museums program. She researches and advises on projects that reexamine the nature of collections within the research library, help secure access to and preservation of the scholarly record, and... Read More →
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director of Libraries, Scholarly Communications and Museums Program, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Previously, Roger was a research associate at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He received degrees... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Regency Ballroom

9:00am

5.2 Technology Is Not the Answer: Why Digital Is Not the Most Important Aspect of Your Digital Strategy
Shortly after its establishment in 1970, researchers at Xerox Parc invented the personal computer, complete with graphical user interface, windows, icons and a mouse. Yet, Xerox completely failed to successfully market and sell the personal computer and is still today known for making photocopiers and mainframes. In 1975, an employee at Kodak built the first digital camera. In 2012, Kodak filed for bankruptcy, having had its photographic film business disrupted by competitors invested heavily in promoting the "new" technology of digital photography. So why do large organizations (including academic institutions) fail to evolve with the times? And what is your strategy for supporting evolution and innovation in your organization? How do you adapt to and benefit from change and new ideas? In 2018, Athenaeum21 was commissioned to conduct an environmental scan of how and why digital strategies in a range of organizations succeed, and also why they "fail." We define "digital strategy" as "a plan of action for the adoption of institutional processes and practices to support and/or transform the organization and culture to effectively and competitively function in an increasingly digital world." Our research included a literature review, web review, and interviews with thought leaders and practitioners in digital transformation and digital skills-building in higher education, non-profits, and corporations. The report we produced provides examples of successful practices undertaken by organizations actively managing digital transformation and benefiting from their investments in innovation in Canada, the United States and Europe, as well as examples of so-called "failed" digital strategies. The answers as to why digital strategies succeed or fail are complex, but all hinge on six key elements that we identified during the research: 1. People, 2. Culture, 3. Leadership, 4. Organizational Alignment, followed by 5. Data, and 6. Technology. We will present our findings and model, with examples of how and why people, culture, leadership, and organizational alignment are more important for digital transformation than data and technology. We would like to have a robust discussion of how this model fits with your own local context.

Speakers
avatar for Megan Hurst

Megan Hurst

Chief Experience Officer, Athenaeum21
I co-founded Athenaeum21 with Christine Madsen to help libraries, museums, publishers and knowledge organizations evolve, innovate, and lead our information age. My areas of expertise and passion are user experience, user research, digital strategy, assessment, digital humanities... Read More →
avatar for Christine Madsen

Christine Madsen

Chief Innovation Officer, Athenaeum21
Dr Christine Madsen works at the intersection of libraries and technology. She is expert in building large-scale systems that use technology to connect researchers, teachers, and students with library and learning resources. She is interested in understanding and building the library... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Executive Room

9:00am

5.3 Leveraging Library Expertise for University Rankings
It is becoming increasingly important for universities to monitor and understand institutional rankings. National and international rankings have a strong impact on student enrollment and on recruiting and retaining top-level graduate students and faculty. A key element in determining rank is how a university's research enterprise is represented within publication and citation databases. As experts in such systems, research libraries can leverage their knowledge of bibliometric analysis, resource management, and scholarly communications infrastructures to make significant contributions to institutional rankings initiatives. This session will provide briefings on how the libraries at Case Western University and the University of Rochester are leveraging library expertise to provide business intelligence and strategies to support rankings projects.

Speakers
avatar for Liz Bernal

Liz Bernal

Library Assessment Officer, Case Western Reserve University
avatar for Lauren Di Monte

Lauren Di Monte

Director of Research Initiatives, University of Rochester


Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Diplomat Room

9:00am

5.4 Addressing the 20th Century Gap: Controlled Digital Lending by Libraries
Book scanning projects have made tremendous strides in bringing public domain literature online for the world's scholars and enthusiasts. Materials published after 1923, however, are still not widely available due to US copyright restrictions. The recently published "Position Statement on Controlled Digital Lending" describes a method for addressing this research gap. Through controlled digital lending, libraries can make twentieth-century scholarship available that is largely absent from their digital holdings in a way that respects the rights of authors and publishers. Publishers, too, can participate in controlled digital lending; projects between the Internet Archive, MIT Press, and other university presses are digitizing backlist and out-of-print books and making them available for controlled digital lending. This panel will bring together co-authors of both a related white paper and the position statement to provide an overview of controlled digital lending, as well as the perspective of the publishing community.

https://controlleddigitallending.org/


https://archive.org/details/inlibrary

Speakers
avatar for Kyle K. Courtney

Kyle K. Courtney

Copyright Advisor, Harvard Library
Kyle K. Courtney is an attorney, librarian, and gentleman farmer, presently working as the Copyright Advisor out of Harvard University's Office for Scholarly Communication. Kyle created the Copyright First Responder network for Harvard, which is a team of copyright trained librarians... Read More →
TE

Terry Ehling

Managing Director, MIT Knowledge Futures Group, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
avatar for Chris Freeland

Chris Freeland

Director of Open Libraries, Internet Archive
Chris Freeland is the Director of Open Libraries at the Internet Archive, working with partners in the library world to select, source, digitize and lend the most useful books for scholars, students, library patrons and people with disabilities around the world. Before joining the... Read More →
DH

David Hansen

Associate University Librarian for Research, Collections & Scholarly Communications, Duke University


Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Congressional A

9:00am

5.5 User Research: Can LOD Help Users Engage with and Make Better Use of Digitized Special Collections?
How do scholars today engage with digitized special collections? Can the use of Linked Open Data (LOD) methods and models facilitate and/or encourage user engagement? As libraries work to implement new cataloging and metadata workflows that make use of emerging LOD-friendly ontologies like BIBFrame and schema.org, user research spanning a range of contexts is needed to help answer these and related questions. This briefing looks at two case studies undertaken to better understand how users engage with digitized special collections hosted by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Collection search interfaces were enhanced to take advantage of LOD-based services and resources. The first study looked at Emblematica Online, a web resource providing integrated discovery of and access to items in six major collections of digitized emblem books from libraries in the US and Europe. Results highlight the importance of user engagement and suggest that the diverse and complex ways that scholars want to use such collections will require libraries to expand the capabilities of their digital collection platforms and enhance the connectedness of their content. The second study looked at experimental LOD-based enhancements to the Motley Collection of Theater and Costume Design and the Kolb-Proust Archive for Research. This study focused on initial user response to experimental LOD features added to search interfaces. Results suggest that scholars are intrigued by some affordances offered by LOD, but that libraries will need to iteratively engage potential users to optimize the ways that LOD helps connect content and facilitate engagement in varying use contexts. In addition to reflecting on user research they have done to date, presenters will speculate on how libraries can more effectively engage users and gather evidence to inform the evolution of systems that provide access to digitized special collections.

http://emblematica.library.illinois.edu/  




http://imagesearch-test1.library.illinois.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/motley-new/  



https://muse.jhu.edu/article/672183 



http://www.ala.org/acrl/files/conferences/confsandpreconfs/2015/Green_Wade_Cole_Han.pdf 



http://hdl.handle.net/2142/100121

Speakers
TW

Timothy W. Cole

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
KF

Katrina Fenlon

Assistant Professor, College of Information Studies, University of Maryland
avatar for Harriett Green

Harriett Green

Associate University Librarian, Washington University in St. Louis
I am the Associate University Librarian for Digital Scholarship and Technology Services at Washington University in St. Louis.


Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Congressional B

9:00am

5.6 RA21: Resource Access for the 21st Century - Pilot Results and New Recommended Practices
Resource Access for the 21st Century (RA21) is a joint STM and National Information Standards Organization (NISO) initiative aimed at optimizing protocols across key stakeholder groups, with a goal of facilitating a seamless user experience for consumers of scientific communication. In addition, this comprehensive initiative is working to solve long-standing, complex, and broadly distributed challenges in the areas of network security and user privacy. RA21 development began following the report by the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) on the Authentication and Authorization Survey conducted in 2016.  The pilots: two technical academic and one corporate pilot are now complete. This session will share more information about these outcomes and the technology selected; the UX (user experience) refinements underway, and recommended practices. The RA21 team will also discuss output from its recent Security and Privacy report, and discuss next steps for the project: establishment of a multi-stakeholder governance model to take the recommendations forward.  Gradual implementation & adoption by publishers/institutes starts 2019.

https://ra21.org/


https://www.stm-assoc.org/


https://www.niso.org/

Speakers
avatar for Todd Carpenter

Todd Carpenter

Executive Director, National Information Standards Organization (NISO)
Standards. Standards. Standards. Wine. Standards. Standards. Standards.
avatar for Jean P. Shipman

Jean P. Shipman

Vice President, Global Library Relations, Elsevier
I will be glad to talk with people about libraries and Elsevier.
RY

Ralph Youngen

Director, Publishing Systems Integration, American Chemical Society
Director, Publishing Systems Integration


Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Cabinet Room

9:00am

5.7 Curating Reuse: An Institutional Approach to Statistical and Computational Reproducibility
The University of Colorado Boulder Center for Research Data and Digital Scholarship (CRDDS), a partnership between the Libraries and Research Computing, in collaboration with the Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Statistical Analysis (LISA) is building a tiered service model to enhance existing data curation workflows and enable wider and more effective reuse of data produced on campus. The program offers both retrospective (end of project) and prospective (beginning of project) consultation-based and hands-on curation services, including file, documentation, data, code, and statistical reviews designed to improve statistical and computational reproducibility and reuse. Inspired by cross-institutional efforts like the CURE Consortium and the Data Curation Network, CRDDS is developing a sustainable service model based on a network of experts across campus that work together to improve data quality. We believe this model could be of interest to other institutions where data curation, statistical support, and research computing services exist but are not well integrated. This service strengthens the community of practice surrounding open science and open data practices on campus, supports departments that are navigating general and domain specific reproducibility issues, and creates opportunities for future cross and interdisciplinary collaborations. We are currently collecting proposals for pilot projects to evaluate the workflows we have developed, and will be in the active process of curating pilot datasets at the time of the CNI Membership Meeting. We encourage discussion about this institution level curation service among the audience and welcome questions and suggestions as we work on establishing and documenting a sustainable service model.

https://www.colorado.edu/crdds/

Speakers
KM

Katie Mika

Data Services Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder


Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Forum Room

9:00am

5.8 Prototypes for Enhancing the Discoverability of Digital Humanities Scholarship
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) funded planning grant, "Integrating Digital Humanities into the Web of Scholarship," sought to identify ways that existing tools and services could make it easier to discover and link the many distributed digital humanities assets created by scholars. Through this planning grant, we uncovered a number of common challenges and a variety of solutions to supporting the appropriate discoverability and stewardship of digital humanities research. Though best practices and standards for stewarding digital humanities projects are limited or unclear, tools and technologies to automate metadata extraction and visualize distributed assets are a useful step to enhance discoverability. This panel will report on both what we learned and, specifically, two prototypes created during the course of the grant: the targeted pilot projects focusing on identifying and then extracting descriptive metadata from Omeka sites and a dashboard created from NEH grant information. We will solicit feedback from attendees, seeking to better understand community needs for the discovery of digital humanities scholarship.

Speakers
avatar for Judy Ruttenberg

Judy Ruttenberg

Program Director for Strategic Initiatives, Association of Research Libraries
Judy Ruttenberg is primarily responsible for managing the SHARE initiative, which is building a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. While at ARL, Judy has also directed the Transforming Research Libraries initiative, which included... Read More →
JS

Jeffrey Spies

Principal, 221B Consulting
avatar for Cynthia Hudson Vitale

Cynthia Hudson Vitale

Head Research Informatics and Publishing, Pennsylvania State University


Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Senate Room

9:45am

Break
Tuesday December 11, 2018 9:45am - 10:15am
Ambassador Ballroom

10:15am

6.1 What Is the Future of Libraries in Academic Research?
Research has changed. Have libraries? Research at the University of Calgary has identified a constellation of services necessary to enable today's multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research. This session will address the nature of evolving challenges and explore steps critical to the future of research libraries. With support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Libraries and Cultural Resources is seeking to instantiate a combination of services, expertise, and infrastructure through direct partnerships between library staff and scholars in a diversity of research endeavors. This research, enabled by competitive sub-grants, has ranged from providing real-time public access to arctic sensors to digitization and textual analysis of early science fiction writings to a repository for 3D scans of cultural heritage sites. This process will be examined from the perspective of the project coordinator, detailing the nature and results of direct participation by library staff in the various research projects and in the re-envisioning of library space as a constantly changing research lab. A social anthropologist, and lead investigator in one of the funded projects, will illustrate her team's introduction of empathetic cultural mapping, an approach that blends personal stories with population-level data. She will provide a researcher's perspective on how this experience has produced for her and her team a new understanding of the scope of library services and the opportunities for substantive collaboration. The project's principal investigator will address the critical importance of implementing a functional infrastructure and adopting a new model for the role of the library in campus research. He will describe the potential impact of this redefinition on libraries and on their continuing relevance in the research enterprise.

https://library.ucalgary.ca/libraryresearchplatform

https://library.ucalgary.ca/libraryresearchplatform/dissemination

Speakers
avatar for John Brosz

John Brosz

Project Coordinator, University of Calgary
Dr. John Brosz is the Project Coordinator at the University of Calgary for the Academic Research and University Libraries: Creating a New Model for Collaboration Project funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This project issues subgrants to Calgary scholars that fund research... Read More →
SG

Suzanne Goopy

Associate Professor, University of Calgary
avatar for Tom Hickerson

Tom Hickerson

Principal Research Investigator, University of Calgary


Tuesday December 11, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Regency Ballroom

10:15am

6.2 Scaling Artificial Intelligence in Libraries Via a National Project Registry
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is becoming key to dealing with modern, knowledge-based economies and it is permeating our lives further each day. The potential for AI to play key roles in knowledge creation within academic institutions is rapidly emerging. This presentation will briefly explore the AI environment in higher education, using a case study from the University of Oklahoma (OU) Libraries. Developers at OU Libraries have been working in two primary areas: 1) A chatbot that can answer patron questions based on the ALA READ Scale through AI software that uses a system of natural language processing, API integrations, and the tagging of web content and, 2) Application of a separate concept extraction tool on researcher created content in order to find and increase research collaborations between researchers at both the local and national levels. For these projects to reach their full potential, a way to scale the implementation rapidly must be put in place. We will discuss the planned launch of the new National AI Project Registry. This registry will be for institutions to record their AI projects for the express purpose of finding collaborators. This national registry will help researchers learn what is happening at other institutions while also providing opportunities to collaborate and/or build off of the work of others on topics like implementation issues, controlled vocabularies, and licensing issues.

https://bot.ivy.ai/sandbox/zBZqxLvJOK405aMJ7AGerQW1RoE2pVYX

Speakers
avatar for Twila Camp

Twila Camp

Senior Director of Digital Innovation & Development, Libraries, University of Oklahoma
As the Senior Director of the Digital Innovation and Development Division, Twila supports the libraries major strategic pillars by providing leadership for library technology, services, and platforms. This division also provides critical support for researchers seeking grants by offering... Read More →
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Dean of Libraries (Interim), University of Oklahoma
Dean (Interim) of The University of Oklahoma Libraries, a facility that has been undergoing a rapid transformation for the last five years. Here is a link to our latest annual report that shows the scope of work being done here: https://issuu.com/oulibraries/docs/ou_libraries_... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Executive Room

10:15am

6.3 Public Access Submission System
Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, MIT, and 221B have developed the Public Access Submission System (PASS), which will support compliance with US funding agencies' public access policies and institutional open access policies. By combining workflows between the two compliance pathways, PASS facilitates simultaneous submission into funder repositories (e.g., PubMedCentral) and institutional repositories. We intend to integrate a data archive so that researchers can submit cited data at the same time. PASS also features a novel technology stack including Fedora, Ember, JSON-LD, Elasticsearch, ActiveMQ, Java and Shibboleth (with an eye toward multi-institutional support). This talk will include a demonstration of PASS in action. The talk will also outline the steps by which we have engaged the university's central administration (including the president's office and the provost's office) to provide funding, sponsorship for PASS and access to internal grants databases (e.g., COEUS) and engaged US funding agencies including the National Institutes of Health who have offered access to APIs for tracking and correlating submissions, and the National Science Foundation which discussed ways to integrate PASS and their reporting system in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Birkland

Aaron Birkland

Senior Software Engineer, Johns Hopkins University
Position at Company ABC.
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University


Tuesday December 11, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Diplomat Room

10:15am

6.4 Assessing for Digital Library Reuse: Findings from the Measuring Reuse Project
Content reuse, defined as how often and in what ways digital library materials are utilized and repurposed, is a key indicator of the impact and value of a digital collection. Traditional library analytics focus almost entirely on simple access statistics, which do not show how users transform and remix materials found in digital collections. This lack of distinction, combined with a lack of standardized assessment approaches, makes it difficult to develop user-responsive collections or highlight the value of these materials. Developing a Framework for Measuring Reuse of Digital Objects, an IMLS-funded project (LG-73-17-0002-17) by the Digital Library Federation Assessment Interest Group (DLF-AIG), conducted a needs assessment of the digital library community to determine features of a future assessment toolkit that goes beyond use and traditional library metrics and focuses on transformation. This presentation will provide an overview of the mixed-methods approach used to generate data, share the results of this project, and discuss the next steps for implementation.

Co-Authors (in addition to presenters)

Elizabeth Joan Kelly


Digital Programs Coordinator


ejkelly@loyno.edu   


Loyola University New Orleans

 



Ayla Stein Kenfield


Metadata Librarian
astein@illinois.edu 


University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign





Liz Woolcott


Head of Cataloging and Metadata Services 


liz.woolcott@usu.edu  


Utah State University

https://reuse.diglib.org/

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Muglia

Caroline Muglia

Co-Associate Dean for Collections, University of Southern California
Caroline Muglia is the Co-Associate Dean for Collections at University of Southern California (USC). In this capacity, she also manages collection assessment and resource sharing initiatives at the Libraries.
avatar for Genya O'Gara

Genya O'Gara

Deputy Director, Virtual Library of Virginia
Genya O’Gara is the Associate Director of VIVA, the academic library consortium of Virginia, which represents 72 higher education institutions within the Commonwealth. She received her MSLS from UNC-Chapel Hill, and her BA from the Evergreen State College.
avatar for Santi Thompson

Santi Thompson

Head, Digital Research Services, University of Houston
Santi Thompson is the Head of Digital Research Services at the University of Houston (UH) Libraries. In this role, he develops policies and workflows for the digital components of scholarly communications, including digital research support and digital repositories. Santi publishes... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Congressional A

10:15am

6.5 Simplified Research Data Management with the Globus Platform
The University of Chicago develops and operates the Globus software-as-a-service for data management, used by over 100,000 researchers at universities, national labs, and federal facilities. The Globus platform provides high-speed, reliable file transfer, data sharing, and data publication, as well as federated identity infrastructure that facilitates collaboration across diverse security domains and organizational boundaries. All services are accessible via browser, command line, and REST APIs, enabling access for users with widely differing needs and technical expertise. We will describe, and briefly demonstrate, a number of common use cases, including how researchers can easily access large public data repositories, manage data egress from scientific instruments, and scale interactive data science by integrating with Jupyter notebooks.

www.globus.org

Speakers
avatar for Vas Vasiliadis

Vas Vasiliadis

Globus, University of Chicago


Tuesday December 11, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Congressional B

10:15am

6.6 DRAS-TIC: Fedora at Scale
We are one year into the Institute of Museum and Library Services-funded DRAS-TIC Fedora project, which emerged from discussions at CNI Fall 2016. Having completed the startup phase, we have begun to explore the first set of research questions set forth in our proposal, which concern the practicalities and performance implications of a Linked Data Platform (LDP) server based on Apache Cassandra NoSQL database. We completed extensive interviews with key staff at institutional partners to gather their recent repository needs and limitations. These are documented on our project test bed site, where visitors will soon find detailed performance graphs alongside links to software configurations and code.

Having established requirements, baseline code, and setup of the test bed cluster, we begin the exploratory phase of the project, in which we will create and run performance tests that measure several LDP server implementations under a variety of representative workloads. As we uncover gaps and opportunities we will iterate over own code and configuration, then document the outcomes. We are excited to put our own code and other implementations through their paces and forge a way forward toward next-generation repositories.

http://dcicblog.umd.edu/dras-tic-fedora/


http://drastic-testbed.umd.edu/


https://github.com/UMD-DCIC/gatling-testbed


https://www.trellisldp.org/


https://github.com/ajs6f/trellis-cassandra


https://www.imls.gov/sites/default/files/grants/lg-71-17-0159-17/proposals/lg-71-17-0159-17-full-proposal-documents.pdf


Speakers
avatar for Gregory Jansen

Gregory Jansen

Research Software Architect, College of Information Studies, University of Maryland
avatar for Richard Marciano

Richard Marciano

Professor and Director, Digital Curation Innovation Center, College of Information Studies, University of Maryland
Dr. Richard Marciano is a professor in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland and director of the Digital Curation Innovation Center (DCIC).Prior to that, he conducted research at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San... Read More →
avatar for Adam Soroka

Adam Soroka

Senior Architect / Office of Research Computing / Office of the CIO / the Smithsonian Institution


Tuesday December 11, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Cabinet Room

10:15am

6.7 Evolving a Library's Transcription Project into Digital Humanities Opportunities for Students and Staff
In 2016, William & Mary (W&M) Libraries took the lead on a transcription project for the approximately 450,000 pages or 65,000 items in the British Royal Archives and Royal Library relating to the Georgian period (1714-1837) after becoming partners with the Royal Collection Trust and King's College London in the Georgian Papers Programme (GPP). The GPP partnership members realized immediately that a multifront approach to the transcription was required and selected a variety of solutions that ranged from online crowd-sourcing to the handwritten text recognition tool, Transkribus (developed by the European Union funded READ project). At the start of the project, W&M Libraries had a newly formed Digital Services team, a legacy Omeka-Scripto transcription site, and a university community with an emerging hunger for digital humanities but no current programs. This presentation will briefly describe the project's transcription strategies and the ways W&M Libraries' work on the GPP is making an impact at W&M in digital humanities. It will highlight the opportunities we are creating for students from multiple disciplines to participate in the project and gain real-world digital humanities experience, the new collaborations that have evolved, and, finally, how the project is transforming the perception of the library.

http://transcribegeorgianpapers.wm.edu/


https://www.rct.uk/collection/georgian-papers-programme


https://georgianpapersprogramme.com/


Speakers
DC

Deborah Cornell

Head of Digital Services, College of William & Mary


Tuesday December 11, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Forum Room

10:15am

6.8 Promoting a Public Face for Scholarly Journals
Attacks on academic institutions, the humanities, and the knowledge they create have increasingly inspired scholars to make their work more accessible to the broader public. Many intend for their work to contribute to the pursuit of social justice and, as articulated by the African American Intellectual History Society, to "shed light upon and critically analyze issues of relevance to the public." While scholarly content exists on the network, it is often available only to subscribers. To some extent this limits the extent to which that knowledge can be truly networked. What appears in scholarly journals should also have a life outside scholarly journals. To that end our project has developed a guide to digital tools to enhance articles, repackage journal content to extend its audience, and creatively engage with readers. We aim to demonstrate the exciting possibilities offered by the digital environment to encourage broad thinking about research and scholarship and their role in society.

Speakers
avatar for Seth Denbo

Seth Denbo

Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Initiatives, American Historical Association
Seth Denbo is the Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Initiatives at the American Historical Association. He oversees the publication department of the AHA and is working to develop innovative digital projects to enhance the organization’s mission. He earned his PhD... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Robertson

Stephen Robertson

Director, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University


Tuesday December 11, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Senate Room

11:00am

Break
Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:00am - 11:15am
Ambassador Ballroom

11:15am

7.5 Support for Campus-based Digital Resource Creation through the Science Gateways Community Institute
On campuses across the US, research technology and library units face increasing demands to support digital resources and cyberinfrastructure that serve specific academic disciplines. Such resources may be known as science gateways, collaboratories, virtual research environments, web portals, and virtual laboratories, and what they have in common is that they allow science & engineering (and other) communities to access shared data, software, computing services, instruments, educational materials, and other resources specific to their disciplines. The challenge of developing these resources is that the creators who initiate such projects are often isolated from like-minded individuals tackling the same problems in different disciplines, leading to inadequate awareness and implementation of existing solutions and best practices. The Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) was funded by the NSF to address this problem; it helps gateway creators leverage their funding by providing free or low-cost services and resources that facilitate the sharing of experiences, technologies, and practices. Services include specialized consulting and hands-on development, training and events, and targeted online resources for the gateway community, all with the goal of building community and capacity to grow gateway resources across disciplines. This presentation will outline the NSF-funded services and resources available through SGCI, with examples of projects served, so that CNI meeting attendees can easily identify how the SGCI might engage with members of their institution. Attendees may be particularly interested in the ways that SGCI can supplement or guide the formation of campus-based groups that develop gateways for local, national, or international communities.

https://sciencegateways.org


Speakers
avatar for Katherine Lawrence

Katherine Lawrence

Associate Director, Community Engagement & Exchange, U of Michigan/Science Gateways Community Institute
I help people creating advanced digital resources for research and education connect their projects with helpful services, expertise, and information. Ask me how the Science Gateways Community Institute can support your projects--at no cost--to better leverage the people and money... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:15am - 11:15am
Congressional B

11:15am

7.1 Foundations for Research Computing: Collaborating to Provide Student Support at Scale
In Fall of 2018, the Columbia University Libraries coordinated the rollout of a new campus-wide program to provide students with access to instruction in the fundamentals of computational literacy. Filling the gap between formal course-credit offerings and do-it-yourself approaches, Foundations for Research Computing is the result of a multi-year, multi-stakeholder effort to respond to a need for elemental research computing knowledge as a graduate student core competency. Supported by the graduate schools, campus IT, the office of research, and the libraries, Foundations for Research Computing translates a faculty-led vision for critical instructional intervention into several coordinated services and initiatives, actively assessing program success along the way. Through intensive boot camps, workshops, lectures, and peer-consultation opportunities, Columbia students receive novice-to-intermediate assistance in the use of computational approaches, tools, and infrastructure. The presenters will walk attendees through the development of the partnership that led to the resourcing of the Foundations program and they will discuss opportunities and challenges in coordinating a high-level informal instruction program in computing skills.

http://columbia.edu/rcfoundations

Speakers
avatar for Halayn Hescock

Halayn Hescock

Sr. Director, CUIT Research Services, Columbia University
avatar for Mark Newton

Mark Newton

Director, Digital Scholarship, Columbia University
BR

Barbara Rockenbach

Director, Humanities & History Libraries, Columbia University


Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Regency Ballroom

11:15am

7.2 A Research Object Authoring Tool for the NIH Data Commons
Although FAIR Data is becoming norm across research domains, the issues of scale and privacy have so far impeded the development of reproducible infrastructures for large-scale bioinformatics research. The NIH Data Commons Project [1] is intended to explore solutions towards developing comprehensive, open-source data analysis ecosystems that enable accessible and reproducible data management workflows in the cloud.

Elsevier is participating in a multi-stakeholder consortium, funded by the Data Commons project, to develop components for open cloud-based research infrastructures together with SevenBridges in Cambridge, Repositive in the UK, and the Veteran’s Administration. Using FAIR principles, the project will make biomedical data more Collaborative, Usable, Reproducible, Extendable and Scalable (CURES), by employing a scalable infrastructure, using interoperable standards for the integration and analysis of diverse data types, and providing workspaces with secure and controlled access protocols [2].

In this presentation, I will present the current state of this project and discuss a Research Object [3] Authoring Tool which Mendeley Data [4]/Elsevier are developing, together with the University of Manchester.

[1] https://commonfund.nih.gov/commons
[2] https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171106005807/en/Bridges-Leads-Public-Private-Partnership-Develop-New-Data
[3] http://www.researchobject.org/
[4] https://data.mendeley.com/

Speakers
avatar for Anita de Waard

Anita de Waard

Vice President, Research Collaborations, Elsevier


Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Executive Room

11:15am

7.3 Protecting Privacy on the Web: A Study of HTTPS and Google Analytics Implementation in Academic Library Websites
The library profession has a long history of safeguarding user privacy, and many of our professional organizations have made formal statements to that effect in their foundational documents. But how well do academic libraries protect privacy in the digital age? This presentation will report the results of a recently published study, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and conducted by Montana State University and the University of New Mexico. We audited the websites of 279 academic libraries that are members of one or more of the following professional organizations: the Association of Research Libraries, OCLC Research Library Partnership, or the Digital Library Federation. We tested websites for the presence and effective use of the secure hypertext transfer protocol (HTTPS), the presence of the Google Analytics tracking protocol, and whether libraries have implemented the privacy features that are available in Google Analytics. The results of the study demonstrate conclusively that academic libraries must do much more to ensure user privacy. We will conclude with five specific recommendations that can help libraries enhance web privacy and maintain trust with their users.

Speakers
avatar for Kenning Arlitsch

Kenning Arlitsch

Dean of the Library, Montana State University
avatar for Scott W.H. Young

Scott W.H. Young

User Experience & Assessment Librarian, Montana State University Library
Hi. I'm Scott, a librarian and designer building a human-centered library at Montana State University.


Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Diplomat Room

11:15am

7.4 Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC) Cooperative Update: Program Accomplishments and Future Directions
The Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC) Cooperative is an archival identity management program that began in 2010; with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the SNAC Cooperative has matured into an operational program focused on cooperatively maintaining archival identity management data and providing a web-based discovery service through the website snaccooperative.org. This project update will: demonstrate SNAC's research and editing interfaces, describe program accomplishments in the areas of technology, standards development, training, and outreach, and will outline future directions for a membership and business model.


Speakers
avatar for Ivey Glendon

Ivey Glendon

Deputy Director, Social Networks and Archival Context Cooperative, National Archives and Records Administration


Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Congressional A

11:15am

7.6 From Bibliography to Data Analytics and Image Recognition: The Journey of the Iberian Books Project
The Iberian Books project has been underway since 2010, with the support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. It has completed its goal of documenting printed books (and extant exemplars) issued from 1472 through 1700 within the Iberian sphere of influence: Spain, Portugal, and those territories that fell under their control during the so-called Age of Discovery. During the course of its development, the boundaries of Iberian Books expanded naturally as the understanding of this vast repertory of books developed. As the project approached its conclusion, the evidence base it established was used to create analytics, some of which have been integrated with the bibliographical information, while others have been published on the Iberian Books digital platform. Recent research on this repertory has also now turned to how it could be leveraged to promote and support new areas of research, not least through the creation of an image base of around 230,000 pages containing graphical components such as ornate letters, ornaments and other illustrative material as well as a discovery mechanism that exploits descriptive metadata created in part through machine-learning techniques, and an image-matching service that enables users to search for matching or similar graphics from contemporary books. Known as Ornamento, this resource represents a proof of concept for a new research tool, opening up research into the visual culture of the period, as well as assisting in the identification and dating of imprintless works. The presentation will hopefully engender discussion of Ornamento's approach in general, identifying known issues but also identifying potential additional use cases for this technology as it develops further.

https://iberian.ucd.ie/


https://ornamento.ucd.ie/

Speakers
avatar for John B. Howard

John B. Howard

University Librarian, University College Dublin
AS

Alexander (Sandy) Wilkinson

Professor, School of History, University College Dublin


Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Cabinet Room

11:15am

7.7 Blockchain Can Not Be Used To Verify Replayed Archived Web Pages
As the number of public web archives grows, so does our interest in verifying the integrity of archived web pages replayed from the archive. When web archives disagree when replaying a web page, we are unsure how to resolve the discrepancy. Adopting Segal's law to web archives: "The person with an archive knows what the page looked like. The person with two archives is never sure." At first glance, a distributed public ledger such as blockchain would seem like a good solution to detect damage or tampering of web pages: web pages could be replayed by third parties and their cryptographic hash and time stamps stored in the blockchain. However, we have found over the course of one year through continuously replaying over 17,000 web pages sampled from 20 different public web archives that approximately 75% of the replayed web pages have undergone some kind of change that would cause them to not hash to the same value. Some changes are significant, impacting the semantics of the page itself, but most changes would not be noticed by regular users. Nonetheless, if blockchain or other hash-based values techniques were used to detect tampering, the number of false positives generated by the normal operation of web archives would make detecting actual tampering almost impossible. We review the different kinds of changes with examples drawn from each of the 20 public web archives.

Speakers
ML

Michael L. Nelson

Professor, Old Dominion University


Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Forum Room

11:45am

Lunch
Tuesday December 11, 2018 11:45am - 1:00pm
Palladian Ballroom

1:00pm

8.1 Bolstering Openness and Impact: University Publishing as a Strategic Priority at SUNY
Publishing is a significant activity and strategic priority for many higher education institutions, even if an increasing share has been outsourced, especially to commercial providers, in recent decades. As large and complex organizations, universities support a remarkable array of publishing activities but often without understanding them well enough as a strategic asset that can contribute to scholarly communications priorities. How can universities better understand their own publishing activities and provide greater support to them?

Over the past year, the 64-campus SUNY system has been working with Ithaka S+R to examine its publishing activities broadly. This includes not only its university press but the full panoply of publishing activities of a major and diverse university system, including scholarly and student journals, departmental working paper series, open educational resources, library publishing, institutional repositories, and more. Most of these efforts have grown up independently of one another and in the absence of any kind of central planning or support. Through this project, SUNY has identified numerous opportunities to better serve and support publishing as a major strategic priority. Now, as we move into an implementation phase, we want to reflect with the CNI community about some of what has been learned.

Key topics we will discuss include:
  • The enormous range of publishing activities and the taxonomy we developed to organize them;
  • Opportunities to rethink and expand the work of the university press in alignment with the university mission;
  • The vital importance of considering research workflow platforms as an essential ingredient of any strategic engagement with publishing.
  • Should your university or university system review its publishing activities systematically and develop coordinated mechanisms to support them? 
This session will provide an opportunity to discuss what we learned and consider how it might impact your institution as well.

Speakers
avatar for Mark McBride

Mark McBride

Library Senior Strategist, SUNY
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director of Libraries, Scholarly Communications and Museums Program, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Previously, Roger was a research associate at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He received degrees... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Executive Room

1:00pm

8.2 Libraries Leading the Way: Academy-Led Publishing, Academy Owned Infrastructure
The infrastructure that supports the creation, dissemination and ongoing location of research is increasingly being acquired and commercialized by for-profit publishers, while established mission-driven, non-profit publishers such as university presses struggle to stay afloat. In this panel, representatives from three libraries and the Library Publishing Coalition will talk about the work library publishers are doing in a number of priority areas, including providing affordable open access publishing opportunities, advancing library values through ethical publishing initiatives, and partnering with university presses to grow support for mission-driven publishing. Panelists will briefly introduce three open source publishing platforms: Editoria (University of California), Fulcrum (University of Michigan), and Vega (Wayne State University). They will discuss how their work on these platforms is both advancing strategic goals at their libraries and addressing institutional challenges that exist within an increasingly "locked-in" commercial publishing infrastructure for scholarly communication.

Librarypublishing.org


Fulcrum.org
editoria.pub

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Mitchell

Catherine Mitchell

Director, Access & Publishing Group, California Digital Library, University of California
JN

Joshua Neds-Fox

Wayne State University
Programs Chair, Academic Libraries 2015
avatar for Melanie Schlosser

Melanie Schlosser

Community Facilitator, Library Publishing Coalition
avatar for Charles Watkinson

Charles Watkinson

Associate University Librarian, University of Michigan Library
I'm AUL for Publishing at University of Michigan Library and Director of University of Michigan Press. I'm particularly interested in next-gen institutional repositories, the future of ebook collections and acquisitions, and how books can also get to participate in the networked digital... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Diplomat Room

1:00pm

8.3 Building Infrastructure and Services for Open Access to Research
Advancing open access to scholarship requires building open infrastructure and services for the perpetual access and discoverability of research outputs. This session will feature updates and reports from groups working to build pieces of this infrastructure. Unpaywall, a project of Impactstory, is an open database of over 20 million open access articles. With an API, a browser plug-in, and a growing number of publisher integrations, the service facilitates the easy discovery of open access research publications. The co-founders of Impactstory will report on the status of the Unpaywall project, as well as the soon-to-be-released search engine, http://gettheresearch.org/. The Internet Archive is working with Unpaywall and others in the open access community to ensure the preservation of publicly-accessible research publications and datasets, including at-risk resources via the project, "Ensuring the Persistent Access of Long Tail Open Access Journal Literature." Speakers will talk about their work on indexing, access, archiving, the role of artificial intelligence and machine learning in these projects, joint service provisioning, and their collaborative work and partnership development with libraries, publishers, and non-profit organizations furthering the open access movement.

https://unpaywall.org/


http://gettheresearch.org/

https://blog.archive.org/2018/03/05/andrew-w-mellon-foundation-awards-grant-to-the-internet-archive-for-long-tail-journal-preservation/
https://blog.archive.org/2018/06/05/internet-archive-code-for-science-and-society-and-california-digital-library-to-partner-on-a-data-sharing-and-preservation-pilot-project/

Speakers
avatar for Jefferson Bailey

Jefferson Bailey

Director, Web Archiving & Data Services, Internet Archive
Jefferson Bailey is Director of Web Archiving & Data Services at Internet Archive. Jefferson joined Internet Archive in Summer 2014 and manages Internet Archive’s web archiving services including Archive-It, used by over 600 institutions to preserve the web. He also oversees web... Read More →
avatar for Jason Priem

Jason Priem

co-founder, Our Research
avatar for Nick Shockey

Nick Shockey

Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC


Tuesday December 11, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Empire Room Lower Level 2B

1:00pm

8.4 California Digital Library & Dryad: Community Owned Data Publishing
In light of the current research data landscape, Dryad and California Digital Library (CDL) are formally partnering to address researcher needs and lead an open, community-owned initiative in research data curation and publishing. This partnership is focused on driving adoption of research data publishing by meeting researchers where they are in their workflows. By working together, we will create global efficiencies and minimize needless duplication of effort across institutions, freeing up time and funds. Our goal for this session is to engage with the CNI community and institutional stakeholders on the future of Dryad. The new Dryad service will be focused on being a collaborative data publishing platform that integrates data curation/stewardship more closely into researcher workflows. To accomplish these goals, a new Dryad service will be hosted on a nimble, open-source CDL developed platform, reliant on integrations with journal publishing platforms for ease-of-deposit, and offer a transparent layer for institutions to get involved in data publishing in a system where their researchers are already depositing. But, for Dryad to be a success it will need to be supportive and reflective of institutional values and build a strong institutional community. Members from the Dryad and CDL team will present on the work already underway to launch the new Dryad as well as gain feedback from attendees on our longer-term partnership roadmap and business models.

Speakers
avatar for John Chodacki

John Chodacki

Director, University of California Curation Center (UC3), California Digital Library
John Chodacki is Director of the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at California Digital Library (CDL)
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

Data Publishing Product Manager, California Digital Library - CDL


Tuesday December 11, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Congressional B

1:00pm

8.5 National Agenda for Collaborative Preservation of Electronic Government Information
The PEGI Project was funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to plan a national agenda for collaboratively preserving electronic government information to be implemented by means of the Collective Impact framework for mobilizing cross-stakeholder networks. Over the past year, the project conducted a series of forums on this topic with various stakeholder groups including historians, scientists, librarians, preservation experts, and other categories of concerned citizens. Representatives of these national stakeholder groups have just concluded deliberations regarding a national agenda for collective action going forward. The now well-documented and increasing loss of government electronic information has raised a clarion call for action nationally. This session will feature panel presentations on the results of the PEGI Project and the next steps planned for mobilizing efforts on this critically important problem.  The presenters will cover the following: a recap of the forums held throughout the country to engage different professional stakeholder groups, the newly-published project environmental scan of government information and data preservation efforts and challenges, a summary of the concluding National Forum and proposed Collective Impact efforts going forward, and finally, an interactive discussion with the audience regarding next steps.


Speakers
MH

Martin Halbert

Dean of Libraries, UNCG
avatar for James R. Jacobs

James R. Jacobs

US Government Information Librarian, Stanford University
avatar for Sarah Lippincott

Sarah Lippincott

Assessment and Planning Librarian, UMass Amherst
I'm an information professional with a passion for digital scholarship. I served as the inaugural Program Director for the Library Publishing Coalition, where I built a community of over 60 libraries around the world. I have published and presented widely on library publishing and... Read More →
avatar for Roberta Sittel

Roberta Sittel

Government Information Librarian, University of North Texas
Robbie Sittel is the Government Information Librarian at the University of North Texas where she oversees the Eagle Commons Library, a campus branch library that houses a number of specialized services including UNT?s Government Information Connection and the Funding Information Network... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Cabinet Room

1:00pm

8.6 DataONE: From DataNet Project to Engaged Global Community in the Contemporary Data Landscape
When DataONE was funded nearly a decade ago by the National Science Foundation DataNET program, it had become clear that with increasing volume and diversity of scientific data, researchers would require better solutions to manage and preserve the data they generated and more efficient means to discover the data created by others. DataONE was created to provide a discovery layer across multiple data repositories, provide a preservation option for participants who wished to replicate copies of their data, and conduct a broad education and community outreach campaign. The landscape today is more, not less, complicated with the profusion of open access datasets and repositories, funder and publisher mandates for researchers to make their data openly available, gradual adoption of new practices by scientists, and the slow evolution of structures to incentivize sharing and reuse of data. Over the past several years many more players have emerged, from domain and institutional repositories that host data, to new discovery products and services from Google, Elsevier, and others, requiring new thinking about how to maximize the value and impact of research data in a diversified discovery and use landscape. This session will encourage a discussion of challenges and opportunities in the contemporary data management and discovery landscape, including the ability of the academy to own and operate core infrastructure to manage its data; efforts to promote the use of metadata standards across fields; efforts to add value through expression of dataset provenance; and to transform researcher practices around the sharing and re-use of data. In addition, the session will encourage feedback from participants on areas of greatest need and opportunity for DataONE going forward. While DataONE has been successful in many ways—the federation consists of metadata from 40 scientific data repositories from around the world, referencing more than 1.2M datasets, and has been a key player in raising awareness of and improving data practices across the data lifecycle for researchers, data managers, and data librarians—DataONE is currently examining its sustainability options. This session will share an overview of DataONE progress to date, encourage participation in a discussion about current needs for better discovery and preservation of data, and seek feedback for participants on future directions for DataONE.

Speakers
avatar for Karl Benedict

Karl Benedict

Director of Research Data Services & Information Technology, University of New Mexico
For over 33 years Karl Benedict has had parallel careers in Information Technology, Data Management and Analysis, and Archaeology. Since 1993 when he arrived at UNM he has worked as a Graduate Student in Anthropology, Research Scientist, Research Faculty, Applied Research Center Director... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Maron

Nancy Maron

BlueSky to BluePrint
Nancy works with publishers, librarians and other innovative project leaders to define, test and refine assumptions about their new and existing products and services. She honed her skills in over 20 years of experience working at the nexus of publishing, higher education and technology... Read More →
avatar for Robert Sandusky

Robert Sandusky

Associate University Librarian for Information Technology, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library
Research data management, digital preservation


Tuesday December 11, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Forum Room

1:00pm

8.7 Digital Strategy, Collecting, Content, & Platforms at the Library of Congress: An Update
This briefing provides updates on key digital initiatives and programs at the Library of Congress. Panelists from different units of the Library of Congress will provide updates on work across the institution. Individual presentations will focus on: 1) the recently launched Library of Congress digital strategy, 2) an update on the implementation of the Library of Congress digital collecting plan, 3) information about the development of capacities and policy for ensuring enduring access to digital content, and 4) information about the institution's approach to continuous improvement of digital platforms necessary to digital collecting.

https://blogs.loc.gov/thesignal/2017/03/collecting-digital-content-at-the-library-of-congress/

Speakers
DB

David Brunton

Chief of Platform Services, The Library of Congress
KC

Kristi Conkle

Acting Collection Development Officer, The Library of Congress
TO

Trevor Owens

Head of Digital Content Management, The Library of Congress


Tuesday December 11, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Senate Room

2:00pm

Break
Tuesday December 11, 2018 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Ambassador Ballroom

2:15pm

Closing Plenary: The National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health Partnership in Accelerating Discovery Through Data
The first pillar of the US National Library of Medicine Strategic Plan 2017-2027 is to accelerate discovery and advance health through data-driven research. In 2018, the NIH released its Strategic Plan for Data Science. Accomplishing the goals of these ambitious plans will require partnerships between the US National Library of Medicine and the US National Institutes of Health, and with public and private entities broadly. This talk will lay out the challenges and opportunities facing the scholarly communications community, and advance a call for action through partnerships.

https://www.nlm.nih.gov/

Speakers
avatar for Patricia Flatley Brennan

Patricia Flatley Brennan

Director, National Library of Medicine
Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, is the Director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NLM is the world’s largest biomedical library and the producer of digital information services used by scientists, health professionals... Read More →


Tuesday December 11, 2018 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Regency Ballroom
 

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